The Harmon Foundation in Cooperation With the National Alliance of Art and Industry Presents an Exhibition of Works by Negro Artists at the Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York, N.Y. Art, African-American.
The Harmon Foundation in Cooperation With the National Alliance of Art and Industry Presents an Exhibition of Works by Negro Artists at the Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York, N.Y.

The Harmon Foundation in Cooperation With the National Alliance of Art and Industry Presents an Exhibition of Works by Negro Artists at the Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York, N.Y.

New York: Harmon Foundation Inc., 1933.

Octavo (8 x 5 1/8 inches; 205 x 130 mm), 55, [1] pages in stapled illustrated wrappers.

A scarce, important catalogue for a juried exhibition of 107 works by 57 Black artists, the fifth exhibition of "Negro art" in New York sponsored by the Harmon Foundation.

Artists included James Latimer Allen, William Ellisworth Artis, Richmond Barthé, Samuel Albert Countee, Meta Warrick Fuller, Palmer Hayden, Malvin Gray Johnson, William H. Johnson, Lois Mailou Jones, James A. Porter, Edgar Eugene Phipps, Earle Wilton Richardson, James Lesene Wells, and Hale A. Woodruff.

The Robert C. Ogden Prize for Most Outstanding Work went to Sargent Johnson, who received $150. A photograph of his sculpture, Pearl, is on page 2 of the catalogue. The upper wrapper features "Woman Holding a Jug," by James A. Porter, who received the Arthur A. Schomburg Portrait Prize of $100. The lower wrapper shows "Head of a Girl," a sculpture by William Ellisworth Artis, who received the John Hope Prize in Sculpture of $100. Palmer Hayden received the Painting Prize of $100. Other award winners were Earle Wilton Richardson, James Lesene Wells, and James Latimer Allen.

The catalogue includes an essay, "The Negro Takes His Place in American Art," by Alain Locke of Howard University as well as an unsigned essay on "New Happenings in the Field of Negro Art." There's also a section featuring thumbnail biographies of the artists, along with reproductions of some of the works, all photographed by James Latimer Allen, "Negro photographer."

Real-estate magnate and philanthropist William E. Harmon established the Harmon Foundation in 1922 to give out awards for self-improvement and character development. By 1926, the foundation had established Awards for Distinguished Achievement Among Negroes in eight different fields, including fine arts.

This catalogue is widely held by institutions, with OCLC showing more than 40 institutional holdings. However, it's quite scarce in the antiquarian book trade.

An interesting insight into black art of the early Depression years featuring many artists who played important roles in the Harlem Renaissance.

Further Reading: Gary A. Reynolds and Beryl J. Wright, Against the Odds: African-American Artists and the Harmon Foundation, The Newark Museum, 1989.

CONDITION: Light soiling and foxing to wrappers, staples rusty, internally two tiny ink corrections to text on page 10 but otherwise clean and bright. Very Good or better. Item #2295

Price: $875.00

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